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Reading Pratchett: Feet of Clay - 1st April 2021
Travisina
M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Travisina wrote:

Back to the murder mystery - I loved Pratchett's sly dig about Sherlock Holmes and Clues.


I wouldn't have said 'sly'. Pretty bloomin' obvious he's taking a swipe at it! But yes, neatly done. Presumably Pratchett did his research and talked to real policemen/detectives about how the job works. I.E. mostly waiting for someone to give them the information. Or confessing, Like Dun it Duncan.

Slightly off-topic, but I assistant-edited an adaptation of Crime & Punishment. All the way through, I kept thinking it was like 'Columbo', where the policeman politely follows the suspect around, asking questions and wearing him down until he confesses (no forensics back in Dostoyefsky's day).

Years later, I heard a radio programme about the making of Columbo, in which it was revealed that the character was indeed based on the policeman in Crime and Punishment. I shouted 'Yes!' and punched the air so hard, I nearly crashed the car.
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
stormypetrel
M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Why did the Golems want a king anyway?
Idea: Was that another Jewish thing, like the Israelites telling Samuel they wanted King Saul so they'd be' like the other nations'?

Perhaps they’d looked at elected politicians and decided monarchy was the way to go after all?
 
Travisina
M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Why did the Golems want a king anyway?
Idea: Was that another Jewish thing, like the Israelites telling Samuel they wanted King Saul so they'd be' like the other nations'?

...and didn't they get into heaps of trouble as a result?! But I'm guessing, yeah.
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
stormypetrel
Travisina wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Travisina wrote:

Back to the murder mystery - I loved Pratchett's sly dig about Sherlock Holmes and Clues.


I wouldn't have said 'sly'. Pretty bloomin' obvious he's taking a swipe at it! But yes, neatly done. Presumably Pratchett did his research and talked to real policemen/detectives about how the job works. I.E. mostly waiting for someone to give them the information. Or confessing, Like Dun it Duncan.

Slightly off-topic, but I assistant-edited an adaptation of Crime & Punishment. All the way through, I kept thinking it was like 'Columbo', where the policeman politely follows the suspect around, asking questions and wearing him down until he confesses (no forensics back in Dostoyefsky's day).

Years later, I heard a radio programme about the making of Columbo, in which it was revealed that the character was indeed based on the policeman in Crime and Punishment. I shouted 'Yes!' and punched the air so hard, I nearly crashed the car.

One of my friends is an ex-police superintendent, and he can’t read crime fiction because it’s so inaccurate it annoys him!
 
M1795537 OC Virn
Travisina wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Travisina wrote:

Back to the murder mystery - I loved Pratchett's sly dig about Sherlock Holmes and Clues.


I wouldn't have said 'sly'. Pretty bloomin' obvious he's taking a swipe at it! But yes, neatly done. Presumably Pratchett did his research and talked to real policemen/detectives about how the job works. I.E. mostly waiting for someone to give them the information. Or confessing, Like Dun it Duncan.

Slightly off-topic, but I assistant-edited an adaptation of Crime & Punishment. All the way through, I kept thinking it was like 'Columbo', where the policeman politely follows the suspect around, asking questions and wearing him down until he confesses (no forensics back in Dostoyefsky's day).

Years later, I heard a radio programme about the making of Columbo, in which it was revealed that the character was indeed based on the policeman in Crime and Punishment. I shouted 'Yes!' and punched the air so hard, I nearly crashed the car.



Ha! Nice story. You're not as daft as you look.....Well done.
You're not sulking, I hope?
 
Travisina
stormypetrel wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Why did the Golems want a king anyway?
Idea: Was that another Jewish thing, like the Israelites telling Samuel they wanted King Saul so they'd be' like the other nations'?

Perhaps they’d looked at elected politicians and decided monarchy was the way to go after all?

A parallel plot to wanting to get rid of the Patrician and install a puppet king of Ankh Morpork. I loved Nobby's reaction to the suggestion - in fact, the whole sequence where he's being wined and dined is superb.
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
Travisina
stormypetrel wrote:

Travisina wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Travisina wrote:

Back to the murder mystery - I loved Pratchett's sly dig about Sherlock Holmes and Clues.


I wouldn't have said 'sly'. Pretty bloomin' obvious he's taking a swipe at it! But yes, neatly done. Presumably Pratchett did his research and talked to real policemen/detectives about how the job works. I.E. mostly waiting for someone to give them the information. Or confessing, Like Dun it Duncan.

Slightly off-topic, but I assistant-edited an adaptation of Crime & Punishment. All the way through, I kept thinking it was like 'Columbo', where the policeman politely follows the suspect around, asking questions and wearing him down until he confesses (no forensics back in Dostoyefsky's day).

Years later, I heard a radio programme about the making of Columbo, in which it was revealed that the character was indeed based on the policeman in Crime and Punishment. I shouted 'Yes!' and punched the air so hard, I nearly crashed the car.

One of my friends is an ex-police superintendent, and he can’t read crime fiction because it’s so inaccurate it annoys him!

Grin
Purplecleric gets annoyed with 'Morse' and 'Lewis', the way they completely mess around with the layout of streets and landmarks of Oxford.

But that's always the case. We used to get letters of complaint at Granada TV if a train or a car or a building in a period piece was wrong.
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
M1795537 OC Virn
stormypetrel wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Why did the Golems want a king anyway?
Idea: Was that another Jewish thing, like the Israelites telling Samuel they wanted King Saul so they'd be' like the other nations'?

Perhaps they’d looked at elected politicians and decided monarchy was the way to go after all?


Pratchett does mention the regicide thing, when Stoneface killed the king, a few times. Maybe here he's saying something about how having a king isn't necessarily a good idea.
And as Travisina said, that fits with the Isreaelite thing, too.
Edited by M1795537 OC Virn on 01 April 2021 20:42:21
You're not sulking, I hope?
 
Travisina
On the subject of forensics, I love that Littlebottom was an alchemist doing forensics for the City Watch.
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
M1795537 OC Virn
Travisina wrote:

stormypetrel wrote:

Travisina wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Travisina wrote:

Back to the murder mystery - I loved Pratchett's sly dig about Sherlock Holmes and Clues.


I wouldn't have said 'sly'. Pretty bloomin' obvious he's taking a swipe at it! But yes, neatly done. Presumably Pratchett did his research and talked to real policemen/detectives about how the job works. I.E. mostly waiting for someone to give them the information. Or confessing, Like Dun it Duncan.

Slightly off-topic, but I assistant-edited an adaptation of Crime & Punishment. All the way through, I kept thinking it was like 'Columbo', where the policeman politely follows the suspect around, asking questions and wearing him down until he confesses (no forensics back in Dostoyefsky's day).

Years later, I heard a radio programme about the making of Columbo, in which it was revealed that the character was indeed based on the policeman in Crime and Punishment. I shouted 'Yes!' and punched the air so hard, I nearly crashed the car.

One of my friends is an ex-police superintendent, and he can’t read crime fiction because it’s so inaccurate it annoys him!

Grin
Purplecleric gets annoyed with 'Morse' and 'Lewis', the way they completely mess around with the layout of streets and landmarks of Oxford.

But that's always the case. We used to get letters of complaint at Granada TV if a train or a car or a building in a period piece was wrong.


If it's wrong, it's wrong.
Wouldn't we all go spare if someone said something inaccurate about B7?
You're not sulking, I hope?
 
stormypetrel
Travisina wrote:

stormypetrel wrote:

Travisina wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Travisina wrote:

Back to the murder mystery - I loved Pratchett's sly dig about Sherlock Holmes and Clues.


I wouldn't have said 'sly'. Pretty bloomin' obvious he's taking a swipe at it! But yes, neatly done. Presumably Pratchett did his research and talked to real policemen/detectives about how the job works. I.E. mostly waiting for someone to give them the information. Or confessing, Like Dun it Duncan.

Slightly off-topic, but I assistant-edited an adaptation of Crime & Punishment. All the way through, I kept thinking it was like 'Columbo', where the policeman politely follows the suspect around, asking questions and wearing him down until he confesses (no forensics back in Dostoyefsky's day).

Years later, I heard a radio programme about the making of Columbo, in which it was revealed that the character was indeed based on the policeman in Crime and Punishment. I shouted 'Yes!' and punched the air so hard, I nearly crashed the car.

One of my friends is an ex-police superintendent, and he can’t read crime fiction because it’s so inaccurate it annoys him!

Grin
Purplecleric gets annoyed with 'Morse' and 'Lewis', the way they completely mess around with the layout of streets and landmarks of Oxford.

But that's always the case. We used to get letters of complaint at Granada TV if a train or a car or a building in a period piece was wrong.

I’m even more anal than that. I noticed them using the wrong fountain pens in ‘Father Brown’. I have both a Parker Sonnet and a WHSmith cheapo, and neither were around in the early 1950s...
 
stormypetrel
M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

stormypetrel wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Why did the Golems want a king anyway?
Idea: Was that another Jewish thing, like the Israelites telling Samuel they wanted King Saul so they'd be' like the other nations'?

Perhaps they’d looked at elected politicians and decided monarchy was the way to go after all?


Pratchett does mention the regicide thing, when Stoneface killed the king, a few times. Maybe here he's saying something about how having a king isn't necessarily a good idea.
And as Travisina said, that fits with the Iseaelite thing, too.

I’m not sure there’s such a thing as an ideal government, of any sort. Blake would have found that out, if he’d succeeded.
 
Travisina
stormypetrel wrote:

Travisina wrote:

stormypetrel wrote:

Travisina wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Travisina wrote:

Back to the murder mystery - I loved Pratchett's sly dig about Sherlock Holmes and Clues.


I wouldn't have said 'sly'. Pretty bloomin' obvious he's taking a swipe at it! But yes, neatly done. Presumably Pratchett did his research and talked to real policemen/detectives about how the job works. I.E. mostly waiting for someone to give them the information. Or confessing, Like Dun it Duncan.

Slightly off-topic, but I assistant-edited an adaptation of Crime & Punishment. All the way through, I kept thinking it was like 'Columbo', where the policeman politely follows the suspect around, asking questions and wearing him down until he confesses (no forensics back in Dostoyefsky's day).

Years later, I heard a radio programme about the making of Columbo, in which it was revealed that the character was indeed based on the policeman in Crime and Punishment. I shouted 'Yes!' and punched the air so hard, I nearly crashed the car.

One of my friends is an ex-police superintendent, and he can’t read crime fiction because it’s so inaccurate it annoys him!

Grin
Purplecleric gets annoyed with 'Morse' and 'Lewis', the way they completely mess around with the layout of streets and landmarks of Oxford.

But that's always the case. We used to get letters of complaint at Granada TV if a train or a car or a building in a period piece was wrong.

I’m even more anal than that. I noticed them using the wrong fountain pens in ‘Father Brown’. I have both a Parker Sonnet and a WHSmith cheapo, and neither were around in the early 1950s...

StormyP, you are AMAZING! I love your knowledge.

Talking of Father Brown (coincidence no.954), I'm listening to old radio adaptations on BBC Sounds, starring Andrew Sachs. They're delightful, and by coincidence coincidence, the one I listened to last night (The Missing Mr Glass) had a dig at Sherlock Holmes.
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
M1795537 OC Virn
stormypetrel wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

stormypetrel wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Why did the Golems want a king anyway?
Idea: Was that another Jewish thing, like the Israelites telling Samuel they wanted King Saul so they'd be' like the other nations'?

Perhaps they’d looked at elected politicians and decided monarchy was the way to go after all?


Pratchett does mention the regicide thing, when Stoneface killed the king, a few times. Maybe here he's saying something about how having a king isn't necessarily a good idea.
And as Travisina said, that fits with the Iseaelite thing, too.

I’m not sure there’s such a thing as an ideal government, of any sort. Blake would have found that out, if he’d succeeded.


Think that comes of us not being ideal people.
You're not sulking, I hope?
 
Travisina
M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Travisina wrote:

stormypetrel wrote:

Travisina wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Travisina wrote:

Back to the murder mystery - I loved Pratchett's sly dig about Sherlock Holmes and Clues.


I wouldn't have said 'sly'. Pretty bloomin' obvious he's taking a swipe at it! But yes, neatly done. Presumably Pratchett did his research and talked to real policemen/detectives about how the job works. I.E. mostly waiting for someone to give them the information. Or confessing, Like Dun it Duncan.

Slightly off-topic, but I assistant-edited an adaptation of Crime & Punishment. All the way through, I kept thinking it was like 'Columbo', where the policeman politely follows the suspect around, asking questions and wearing him down until he confesses (no forensics back in Dostoyefsky's day).

Years later, I heard a radio programme about the making of Columbo, in which it was revealed that the character was indeed based on the policeman in Crime and Punishment. I shouted 'Yes!' and punched the air so hard, I nearly crashed the car.

One of my friends is an ex-police superintendent, and he can’t read crime fiction because it’s so inaccurate it annoys him!

Grin
Purplecleric gets annoyed with 'Morse' and 'Lewis', the way they completely mess around with the layout of streets and landmarks of Oxford.

But that's always the case. We used to get letters of complaint at Granada TV if a train or a car or a building in a period piece was wrong.


If it's wrong, it's wrong.
Wouldn't we all go spare if someone said something inaccurate about B7?

Absolutely!
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
Travisina
stormypetrel wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

stormypetrel wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Why did the Golems want a king anyway?
Idea: Was that another Jewish thing, like the Israelites telling Samuel they wanted King Saul so they'd be' like the other nations'?

Perhaps they’d looked at elected politicians and decided monarchy was the way to go after all?


Pratchett does mention the regicide thing, when Stoneface killed the king, a few times. Maybe here he's saying something about how having a king isn't necessarily a good idea.
And as Travisina said, that fits with the Iseaelite thing, too.

I’m not sure there’s such a thing as an ideal government, of any sort. Blake would have found that out, if he’d succeeded.

Have you listened to 'Spoils'?
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
stormypetrel
Travisina wrote:

stormypetrel wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

stormypetrel wrote:

M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

Why did the Golems want a king anyway?
Idea: Was that another Jewish thing, like the Israelites telling Samuel they wanted King Saul so they'd be' like the other nations'?

Perhaps they’d looked at elected politicians and decided monarchy was the way to go after all?


Pratchett does mention the regicide thing, when Stoneface killed the king, a few times. Maybe here he's saying something about how having a king isn't necessarily a good idea.
And as Travisina said, that fits with the Iseaelite thing, too.

I’m not sure there’s such a thing as an ideal government, of any sort. Blake would have found that out, if he’d succeeded.

Have you listened to 'Spoils'?

Um... possibly? I’m not very good with audio. I zone out.
 
Travisina
stormypetrel wrote:

Travisina wrote:

Have you listened to 'Spoils'?

Um... possibly? I’m not very good with audio. I zone out.

It's one of the very darkest and best Liberator Chronicles, by James Goss (who wrote 'Three' ).
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
M1795537 OC Virn
'Spoil sof War? Why?
(Bother. Having just quickly looked up your review and seen there's one with Servalan, I shall have to buy that now!)
You're not sulking, I hope?
 
M1795537 OC Virn
M1795537 OC Virn wrote:

'Spoils of War? Why?
(Bother. Having just quickly looked up your review and seen there's one with Servalan, I shall have to buy that now!)

You're not sulking, I hope?
 
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