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Current Poll

Who is your Favourite Guest Rebel?

Avalon - (Project Avalon)
Avalon - (Project Avalon)
22% [44 Votes]

Selma - (Horizon)
Selma - (Horizon)
4% [8 Votes]

Tyce - (Bounty)
Tyce - (Bounty)
14% [29 Votes]

Norm One - (Redemption)
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1% [2 Votes]

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7% [15 Votes]

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15% [30 Votes]

Hal Mellanby - (Aftermath)
Hal Mellanby - (Aftermath)
17% [34 Votes]

Hunda - (Traitor)
Hunda - (Traitor)
4% [8 Votes]

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Deva - (Blake)
13% [26 Votes]

Other
Other
4% [8 Votes]

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Started: 09 July 2016

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What are you reading?
Cygnus Bazza
Just finished Iris Murdoch's The Sea, The Sea. Highly enjoyable and a real page-turner, even though it 'jumps the shark' a bit too much at times. One of those slightly irritating books where you read the first hundred pages and think "this is going to be the best book ever!" and then it doesn't quite live up to it.

Am currently on Charlotte Brontė's The Professor, as it's the last of the Brontė novels still on my 'to do' list.
 
Cygnus Bazza
Finished off The Professor. My ranking of Brontė novels would be: 1) The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, 2) Villette, 3) Agnes Grey, 4) Jane Eyre, 5) Wuthering Heights, 6) The Professor, 7) Shirley.

In a similar vein, in case anyone wants to compare notes, my Jane Austen ranking would be: 1) Pride and Prejudice, 2) Northanger Abbey, [3) Lady Susan], 4) Sense and Sensibility, 5) Mansfield Park, 6) Persuasion, 7) Emma
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
Cygnus Bazza wrote:

In a similar vein, in case anyone wants to compare notes, my Jane Austen ranking would be: 1) Pride and Prejudice, 2) Northanger Abbey, [3) Lady Susan], 4) Sense and Sensibility, 5) Mansfield Park, 6) Persuasion, 7) Emma

Not familiar with Brontė, but my Austen ranking would be: Northanger Abbey and Emma first and second, some way ahead of Pride & Prejudice and Mansfield Park in no particular order, then Persuasion with Sense and Sensibility last because it's the one novel that I still can't get on with. I just find both Miss Dashwood's equally frustrating as characters, with nobody that I really relate to.
 
One Spare Part
Cor blimey, how have the pair of you got Northanger Abbey so high in your lists? And, conversely, Persuasion so low?
I am reminded of Manuel in Fawlty Towers: "You craaazy peopless..." Grin Grin
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
Cygnus Bazza
One Spare Part wrote:

Cor blimey, how have the pair of you got Northanger Abbey so high in your lists? And, conversely, Persuasion so low?
I am reminded of Manuel in Fawlty Towers: "You craaazy peopless..." Grin Grin

Northanger Abbey is a hoot and a half. I love a bit of Gothic nonsense and NA subverts all that caper beautifully. Persuasion is a great book - my only small 'criticism' would be that (even by JA's standards) an air of inevitability runs through it from start to finish. For me, it needs a bit more genuine jeopardy. The only one of the set I personally don't like is Emma - I find every single character in it bloomin' irritating! I know Persuasion is 'low' on my list, but SOMETHING's got to be second-last! S&S was the first JA I ever read and I was so pleasantly surprised by it that I ended up reading all the rest, so arguably it's slightly higher in my affections than it deserves. Will have to re-read it sometime.
 
One Spare Part
I will have to try NA again but it really will be hard. I found it a bit excruciating for my tastes. Persuasion, I read annually. To me, there is jeopardy but it is well bred, tasteful jeopardy so perhaps it's not obvious. Like Mansfield Park, it features a heroine who endures her tribulations and finally gets her reward. I suppose that isn't very...sexy? Grin Each to their own! I only ever count 6 books by JA, so we differ there too. I can't make a list cos I am a proper ditherer. But NA would be definitely last, lol.
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
Cygnus Bazza
One Spare Part wrote:

I will have to try NA again but it really will be hard. I found it a bit excruciating for my tastes. Persuasion, I read annually. To me, there is jeopardy but it is well bred, tasteful jeopardy so perhaps it's not obvious. Like Mansfield Park, it features a heroine who endures her tribulations and finally gets her reward. I suppose that isn't very...sexy? Grin Each to their own! I only ever count 6 books by JA, so we differ there too. I can't make a list cos I am a proper ditherer. But NA would be definitely last, lol.

I've a soft spot for 'Lady Susan' so I couldn't leave it out. It's such a short, sharp blast! The film version (Kate Beckinsale) was a bit weird, though. I think I personally prefer Mansfield Park to Persuasion because (don't laugh) I was genuinely surprised (and a bit disappointed TBH) that Fanny ended up with Edmund. I can totally see that NA wouldn't be everyone's cuppa. I sort of like the 'twin centre' nature of the story. Just works for me.
 
One Spare Part
Mansfield Park was a story I had to read a few times to appreciate. Fanny is no one's idea of a heroine but she improves on greater knowledge. As Edmund knew and still got suckered in by the bad girl.
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
Cygnus Bazza
One Spare Part wrote:

Mansfield Park was a story I had to read a few times to appreciate. Fanny is no one's idea of a heroine but she improves on greater knowledge. As Edmund knew and still got suckered in by the bad girl.

I like the fact that (even more than usual with JA) a lot of the crucial stuff in Mansfield Park goes on in Fanny's head. Probably why it's almost impossible to adapt for TV/film. Mind you, very rarely does an adaptation of any of the books really pass muster for me. They just can't adequately convey JA's wit, quite apart from all the stuff that's going on in the characters' headspace.
 
One Spare Part
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Cygnus Bazza wrote:

One Spare Part wrote:

Mansfield Park was a story I had to read a few times to appreciate. Fanny is no one's idea of a heroine but she improves on greater knowledge. As Edmund knew and still got suckered in by the bad girl.

I like the fact that (even more than usual with JA) a lot of the crucial stuff in Mansfield Park goes on in Fanny's head. Probably why it's almost impossible to adapt for TV/film. Mind you, very rarely does an adaptation of any of the books really pass muster for me. They just can't adequately convey JA's wit, quite apart from all the stuff that's going on in the characters' headspace.

And they mostly try to "update" JA these days to make her stories "relevant". JA knew more about the human condition than most modern writers who write about the world they only THINK they live in.
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
Cygnus Bazza
One Spare Part wrote:

[img][/img]
Cygnus Bazza wrote:

One Spare Part wrote:

Mansfield Park was a story I had to read a few times to appreciate. Fanny is no one's idea of a heroine but she improves on greater knowledge. As Edmund knew and still got suckered in by the bad girl.

I like the fact that (even more than usual with JA) a lot of the crucial stuff in Mansfield Park goes on in Fanny's head. Probably why it's almost impossible to adapt for TV/film. Mind you, very rarely does an adaptation of any of the books really pass muster for me. They just can't adequately convey JA's wit, quite apart from all the stuff that's going on in the characters' headspace.

And they mostly try to "update" JA these days to make her stories "relevant". JA knew more about the human condition than most modern writers who write about the world they only THINK they live in.

I second that emotion. Amazing when screenwriters think they know better than the greats. Just tell the story! Can't believe what they do to Agatha C, in particular, these days.
 
Gauda Cheese
The Witchfinders based on the Dr Who ep of the same name.
 
Cygnus Bazza
Re-reading A Room With A View will be a perfect weekend diversion.
 
Cygnus Bazza
Henry James The Europeans.
 
Hugbot
Icerigger by Alan Dean Foster.
When I read the book for the first time as a teenager about 40 years ago, I loved it. Today, it seems rather simplistic, and the female characters and the humour are decidedly 70s stuff. Nonetheless, it is still a fun adventure story.
By the way, instead of shaking hands, the inhabitants of the icy planet Tran-ky-ky greet each other by breathing straight into the other's face to 'share the warmth of their breath.' Sounds definitely unhealthy today!
 
Travisina
Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss.
Short, un-put-down-able, very dark and scary!
My views are my own.

VILA: I'm entitled to my opinion.
AVON: It is your assumption that we are entitled to it as well that is irritating.


Twitter: @TravisinaB7
 
Lee Bagnall
The Most Dangerous Enemy by Stephen Bungay

Comprehensive history of the Battle of Britain. Fascinating read.
"Seldon, Janov. Space Commander. Alpha 14922. Name, rank and serial number. That's all you're getting!"
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
Still working my way through Carola Dunn's Daisy Dalrymple novels, started The Bloody Tower this morning
Edited by Spaceship Dispatcher on 12 September 2021 22:00:29
 
RichardMk2
I've just finished "Arrowood" by Mick Finlay. It's a detective story set in London in 1895. It's also in the same universe as Sherlock Holmes as he is mentioned very often. Our Protagonist is very jealous of Holmes.
 
RichardMk2
I've now started reading "Strings of Murder" by Oscar de Muriell. It's set in Edinburgh in 1888, and it's about a Police Inspector who's also investigating the Supernatural. So a sort of late Victorian X-files!
 
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