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Doctor Who Discussion Thread
Spaceship Dispatcher
Frontier in Space/Planet of the Daleks

This fantastic 12 episode space epic is effctively The Dalek's Masterplan revisited for a 1970s audience, and it has both a similar degree of complexity and a comparable story structure; with a quest element that features space travel as a central part of the plot, see the Doctor seperated from the Tardis, and is also a narrative divided into two halves. We again see the Daleks on a substitute home planet, like a colony in their vast empire, and again we have a story that initially revolves around themes of inter-planetary politics and space treaties. This is a very strong story for Jo Grant; we see her imprisoned (by the rightful government of Earth rather than a villain), lose the Doctor through seperation from him when he is exiled to the Moon and then when she believes that the Doctor might have died of his injuries, and finally become involved in a very sensitively written romantic sub-plot. And so much of the story is dialogue based and character driven, with very few 'event' moments that modern writers would call 'game changing', that this reminds me of other drama of the period with similar strengths such as Blake's 7. What doesn't really come across if you watch Frontier or Planet in isolation is that we have something quite rare for the era with a multi-villain team up of the Master, the Daleks and the Ogrons! We might only have one episode in the middle of the story that that features all of the protagonists and antagonists (except the Thals) together, but this is something that is associated more with the 21st Century revival of the show. Also of note is how the Doctor never comes up against the villains' plan in action (again, as with the Daleks' previous masterplan which never actually started as they didn't have core of the Time Destructor) as the first part of plan to start a space war never succeeds and neither does the plan to mobilise the Dalek army; the story is all about the Doctor taking pre-emptive action and stopping the invasion actually starting in the first place rather than helping to repell it. Initially, there is a very intersting scenario with Earth and Draconia both playing the part of antagonists in relation to our central characters while actually being the 'good guys' whose interests the Doctor trying to protect. The design of this story is excellent from the Earth to the Moon and beyond, with the planet Spiridon being especially worthy of mention; the set and costume design, the sound design and David Maloney's direction all make the planet another memorable fantasy location of the era along with Peladon. The concept of Spiridon created by Terry Nation an excellent starting point for the creativity seen here with his 'ice-volcanoes', dangerous alien flora, deadly fungus, and ancient ruins all adding to the traditional Doctor Who atmosphere. This has been described as a 'Dalek story by numbers' in the past, and it could be described as 'Doctor Who by numbers' too, but this adherence to a tried and tested successful formula imo stands in the favour of the last six episodes inparticular. The part of the story on Spiridon is instantly recognisable as traditional Doctor Who from the mid-1960s as the travellers land on a mysterious alien world, make new allies, and investigate the danger before flight eventually becomes a fight. Likewise, the Daleks here might not be doing anything especially amazing or different but they are definately the awesome and powerful Daleks of 1960s Dalek mania. Planet of the Daleks and Asylum of the Daleks are two of my favourite Dalek stories for many of the same reasons: a simple and formulaic adventure that oozes Dalekmania nostalgia. The Doctor and Jo are, again in a way similar to stories from the earliest years of the show, part of an ensemble of characters once they land on Spiridon rather than meeting other characters in passing as they progress through an adventure; and the Doctor doesn't actually run the show here as he works alongside the Thal expedition, with Taron as a Thal equivalent of the Brigadier. There are some outstanding guest performances in this story with Michael Hawkins as Gen. Williams, Bernard Horsfall as Taron and Prentis Hancock as Vaber. This is a great story, but is often overlooked due to the decision to use seperate story titles for each six episode segment which has resulted in the two halves being released and appraised seperately over the years; however, each six episode segment is only half of the whole. The stories of the tenth anniversary season are generally slower, more dialogue based and more character driven as a trend when compared to other seasons (which imo is a strength) without the more colourful and visual action based stories like The Claws of Axos or The Time Monster. The character of Jo Grant has become stronger, more mature, more independant and more reliable and is a fine example of character development; she will leave as a different person to 'the Doctors new assistant' introduced at the beginning of Terror of the Autons.

Frontier in Space 8/10... Planet of the Daleks and overall: 9/10
Edited by Spaceship Dispatcher on 23 February 2014 15:43:10
Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow. I bet that means something. It sounds great.

Blake's 7: Trojan Horse (s4 fanfic) - Blake's 7: Through the Needle's Eye (s2 fanfic)

Spaceship Dispatcher's fanfic site
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
The Green Death

This is the kind of story that many casual viewers believe made up most of the early 1970s era of the show: the Doctor and Brigadier lead UNIT in a battle against an iconic threat to present day Earth. In reality, this is the first UNIT story set on Earth without the narrative shifting to the past or present or an alien world since The Daemons two seasons previously, and is the first such story without the Master since Liz Shaw was the Doctor's companion. So much had the Master been central to the series' format, that Letts and Dicks played with the fact by misdirecting the audience with a hypnosis sub-plot from the first episode. It also has a very interesting narrative structure, as the Doctor and company face two related but seperate threats; Global Chemicals, and the BOSS' plans for World domination, provide an intelligent and scheming antagonist for the Doctor to thwart while the giant maggots are an unstoppable and unthinking non-human challenge. Global Chemicals don't know any more about the maggots than UNIT do, and are just as keen for them to be destroyed. John Dearth gives a memorable performance as the voice of the BOSS, and has some amazing dialogue to work with. We have a genuine relationship between the computer and its human operator, with some great banter that develops between scenes such as when the BOSS tells Stevens "you are inefficient but you are also a fool" in one scene and then follows it up with "Oh Stevens, you're a dull fool too" in a later scene. The set design in this serial maintains the high standard of previous stories and the mine tunnels, the lifting gear control room, the Wholeweal community's rooms and the interier of the BOSS are all immaculate. The model and special effects works is effective throughout, but the maggot props and the pyrotechnics of the giant cable wheel seizing are especially good. The script is well written, and takes plenty of time with character building and exposition before getting the adventure into top gear later on; the first two episodes involve Jo arriving and going down the mine to help the miners and the Doctor going after her, in the same 50 minutes as modern writers fit an entire story into. It was good that the creative team did decide to tell this story in the way that they did, without trying to force other elements into the screen time, as we get a 'model UNIT story' with the whole UNIT 'family' present and fighting a terrestrial threat without an alien menace or the Master to steal the limelight. From a character point of view, Jo is not really the Doctor's assistant in this story; the Doctor himself comments to that effect in episode one as Jo stands her ground for her personal independance and, even though she begins the story on a different personal mission to the Brigadier, she has very much become a UNIT operative in her own right. As an aside, its interesting how the Cliff/Jo proposal scene was written in episode six; Cliff being a 'valleys boy' at heart is looking to forward to marrying his sweetheart in Cardiff and has assumed that Jo, in accepting his offer to travel with him, has accepted this also while Jo as the 'modern city chick' was merely thinking of a cohabitation arrangement. The Brigadier for his part acts quite strangely in this story, being antagonistic and confrontational towards Stevens right from the start even when there's no need to be and when it is counter productive; an example being his abrupt refusal of an office for a UNIT representative within the GC building, when an episode later he sends Mike Yates into the company pretending to be from the ministry. It would have been a lower risk gambit with a greater chance of success to just accept the office and man it with Yates as a UNIT Captain as it would not have been weighed down by the pointless subterfuge, as Yates has no more freedom as a ministerial secretary than he would have had as a UNIT officer but is at risk of discovery as a spy. But certainly, the Brigadier in this story is an assertive authority figure and not a buffoon. However, imo its two notable guest performances that raise this production to Doctor Who greatness with Jerome Willis (Stevens) and Stewart Bevan (Cliff Jones) standing tall on either side of the battle for the Valleys. Finally, the sentimental and relaxed close to the final episode, embracing the goodbyes that the series normally avoids, rounds off a special adventure with a special and memorable final scene... 10/10
Edited by Spaceship Dispatcher on 23 February 2014 15:56:38
Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow. I bet that means something. It sounds great.

Blake's 7: Trojan Horse (s4 fanfic) - Blake's 7: Through the Needle's Eye (s2 fanfic)

Spaceship Dispatcher's fanfic site
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
Death of the Doctor

The Doctor, Jo Grant and Sarah Jane Smith in one adventure? It was a long time coming, but it was so good! They are joined by Sarah's own companions Clyde and Rani, and by Jo's grandson Santiago, in an enjoyable and emotional UNIT with a bit of a twist; that its a UNIT officer who is in league with the villains. Okay, not such a twist for Sarah after finding Mike Yates on the side of Operation Golden Age maybe but still quite a surprise on first viewing. Plenty of time is taken for long scenes between the three leads as their characters share thoughts and emotions on the years they have spent apart, and its obvious that they're all having a wonderful time. The story itself, with the inter-galactic funeral directors the Shansheeth plotting to steal the Tardis, is engaging and fun while still taking time to slow the pace feel like a flash-back to classic Doctor Who; and there's plenty of actual flash-backs to be seen too, as Jo and Sarah are forced to recall their adventures into the aliens' machine. With the presence of Matt Smith on great form, the return of UNIT, Jo and Sarah together after so many years, and all the small details like music cues, special effects and clips from previous episodes, this is one of those stories that absolutely ties the Sarah Jane Adventures into the wider Doctor Who canon. This was wonderful, and even more emotional in hindsight knowing that it was definately both the first and the final Jo and Sarah story that could be recorded. Its difficult to fit so much into so short a time, and it would have been even better over more episodes, but its a very special memory. 7/10
Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow. I bet that means something. It sounds great.

Blake's 7: Trojan Horse (s4 fanfic) - Blake's 7: Through the Needle's Eye (s2 fanfic)

Spaceship Dispatcher's fanfic site
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
Asylum of the Daleks

Really enjoyed this episode - the series is completely back on form - and imo it's possibly the best story about the Daleks themselves since their first appearance in the 'new series' in 2005. There was a lot of nostalgia and old ideas being fused into something new and brilliant here! There was the question of what it's like to actually be a Dalek as a character, revisited for the first time really since Dalek; there were reassuring echoes of Stolen Earth with the Daleks as a mighty civilisation; even more significantly, this was like an installment of Big Finish's brilliant audio series Dalek Empire (that starred Gareth Thomas) and Oswin's story is very much a repeat of Susan Mendes' story with regards her real situation; and some of the visuals like the opaque white walls, the simple but dark and atmospheric Asylum itself, and even Karen Gillan's costume and makeup all created a very good 1960s retro feel about the episode. It simply screamed TV Century 21/TV Comic Dalek comic strips! This is Doctor Who going back to its roots and revisiting some its more recent triumphs at the same time, but drawing on the rich variety of the Doctor Who sub-genre rather than just the series on television. The way that Steven Moffat wrote the personal drama elements into this episode was skillfully done and had the sense of real emotions in an unreal environment that Russell T Davies always excelled at. Regarding the cast, all the regulars played their parts well.

Dinosaurs on a Spaceship

Lots of Jurassic Park and Primeval ingredients, but it stylistically referenced so much more. The early scenes with Solomon watching the group reminded me of the Master of the Land of Fiction in episodes 2/3 of The Mind Robber (6.2). But more obvious was the sequence of Rory and Brian flying the ship, a wonderful recreation of both flying the TARDIS in The Stolen Earth part 2 and the launch of the Pandorica in the s31 finale, and then the scene of Amy Pond and Riddell defending themselves against the raptors in a great visual nod to the similar scene with River Song and the Silents in Day of the Moon. Super stuff. The dialogue was spot on by one of the revived series best ever writers - Chris Chibnall. Some of the exchanges involving Amy, Riddell and Nefertiti were brilliant, but there were lots of great lines and very good comedy. What was good was the way that the comedy was played against a very deep, dark and three dimensional backdrop of deception and genocide. Also, the final act by the Doctor was worthy of David Tennant's portrayal of the character - cold and ruthless away from the gaze of his companions, which reminded me of the revelations at the end of Human Nature. But this story was all about big ideas - the SF concepts on display, but also the big ideas and arrogance of the characters but each in their own way. Every character has a powerful moment of self-assertiveness where they place themselves above all others, and that builds what we know about them. From the Doctor confronting Brian as an intruder at the start of the episode to Solomon taking the life of the triceratops in an attempt to excert his power over the Doctor. The death scene of the creature was itself a powerful moment of sadness and loss that contrasted with the lighter elements, especially the scenes with the golf balls, and made this a special episode in its own right. The way the story linked into the history of the Silurians and events in pre-history described in 7.2 Doctor Who and the Silurians was very effective and linked the episode in the series canon without overloading the episode with continuity - and recalled series 3 story The Ark at the same time, with the theme of history repeating. Well done all concerned.

A Town Called Mercy

A morally deep, slow paced, well written and performed adventure that used 19th Century America as a historical setting without going too far overboard in trying to make it like a Western. A few twists and turns and a little bit of action but mostly a good 'short story' plot and lots of dialogue that gave the cast a chance to shine. Good all round, and some nice humour inejected at appropriate moments. And Karen Gillan was more stunning every week...

The Power of Three

That was completely brilliant! Very traditional British SF storytelling values with a nice Kneale-esque style, and full credit to the writers for not feeling the need to introduce an alien people - just an abandoned ship left on auto-pilot carrying out work that's no longer needed, very much like in The Curse of the Black Spot. The episode was also very reminiscent of the Russell T era, with lots of focus on the lives and family of the companions and their relationship with the Doctor, and it was great to see UNIT again. Nice also to see the return of Kate, and good to see that they found an actress who shared a likeness with Beverley Cressman, although there was no mention of Gordon. The design and direction was excellent again, and it was especially good to follow the Doctor and the Ponds at home and on some travels that weren't related to the plot with the boxes. In fact, with the main emphasis very much on the characters, it was more like the sub-plot with the boxes. Very, very good episode.

The Angels Take Manhattan

Simply amazing and wonderful. A true sequel to Blink and imo as good a final story for a companion (or two) as there has ever been. Clever, well paced, great performances and a 'happy ever after' ending that I longed for but doubted I would get. Karen didn't quite get her wish for a story that ruled her out of the cast for ever as crossover episode featuring a cameo for the Ponds in their New York life (like Martha and Mickey in The End of Time) is still possible and that in itself is a wonderful thing. This has been the most amazing five episodes of Doctor Who that I have seen for years and right now I'm more happy as a lifelong fan than I know words to type. Not the very best episode of all time because the plot was necessarily shallow to leave enough room for the main issues, but as a character focused drama production within the Doctor Who sub-genre this was impossible to beat.

First impressions of s33 episodes rescued from previous version of the site...
Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow. I bet that means something. It sounds great.

Blake's 7: Trojan Horse (s4 fanfic) - Blake's 7: Through the Needle's Eye (s2 fanfic)

Spaceship Dispatcher's fanfic site
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
The Snowmen

Initial reaction was that I enjoyed that, a good average 7/10 sort of episode. Nothing sensational but a story that was easy to follow, filled an hour quite nicely, half answered a big question about the current series from an earlier episode, was full of performers having a good time and enjoying being on the show, and brought back three popular characters from recent episodes. Richard E Grant played a background rather than a minor role, as suggested by at least one critic who went to the preview screening, and his lurking menace was probably more effective for not having a huge amount of lines. All in all, a good episode that I'll enjoy watching again but probably not over and over again.

The Bells of St John

That was a fantastic episode! Right up there alongside last year's The Power of Three, there were some nice continuity links with UNIT and the Great Intelligence both making brief reappearances. Celia Imrie was a regular in the 1982 season Bergerac, starred in classic SF serial The Nightmare Man, and more recently was part of the ensemble cast of Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. She was excellent in this story, not least in her final scene, and already this current series had seen some very memorable antagonists with Adrian Scarborough, David Bradley, Richard E Grant and now Celia Imrie. The internet as a communications medium was effectively used here, but so was social networking in general. The motorbike was a nod to both a recent James Bond film (apparently, I haven't seen it) and also the Paul McGann special. Matt Smith was excellent as usual, and Jenna-Louise Coleman was both stunning and talented. We learn a couple of background details about Clara, but ongoing continuity with the Clara story-arc was definately kept in second place to the story. This was first and foremost a memorable adventure story, very well created and realised by all concerned. As an introductory story for a new companion, there was nothing especially seminal or emotionally dramatic here and it was a simple Doctor vs alien threat to contemporary Earth story - but that was a strength rather than a weakness. A very good restart to the current series post-Pond.

The Rings of Akhaten

The Rings of Akhaten gets 6/10 from me. There was no story! Lack of depth I can accept if the episode is engaging, full of great characters and dialogue, and set somewhere that I can relate to in some way. But this was just visual trickery, monsters roaring and chasing/attacking people, and a lot of set pieces with very abrupt dialogue. The ideas about objects with emotional energy (rather like a medium using a personal item) had some mileage but it was stated in such simple terms and thrust down the viewers throats so hard that any mystery was non-existent. The production values were okay, and the cast did reasonably well - but Matt Smith especially struggled with some of the awful unnatural lines he was given to say, and it didn't work to only have three major speaking parts including the two leads. The creature in the box amounted to nothing. Why do these beings just roar and throw themselves about these days, where are the likes of Sutekh? The guards amounted to nothing either. And as for the star! It has been correctly pointed out that destroying the star must upset the natural order of things in that planetary system, causing incalculable damage and loss of life - but this is completely ignored at the end. Quite disappointing.

Hide

Brilliant! Simply brilliant. That's a sensational 9/10 from me with no reservations, my favourite episode for three years since Vincent and the Doctor without any reservations at all. The Stone Tape (including loads of direct references) plus Sapphire & Steel, plus spade-fulls of Primeval s3, equals this masterpiece! Excellent highly effective location filming, two of the best performances in the series of recent years from Dougray Scott and Jessica Raine, beautiful narrative pacing with cold creepy moments and powerful emotive moments and fast adventurous moments all blended together with perfect dialogue. Jenna-Louise Coleman is a great companion and has started doing the same kind of expressive comedy with Matt Smith that imo was so enjoyable and amusing to watch when Karen Gillan used to employ it in her first and last seasons. The plot was genuinely intriguing and mysterious, and the revelations when they came were all logical and spread properly through the script. This is a new contender for my favourite episode of s33, even beating Asylum of the Daleks. The continuity link with Planet of the Spiders was there for the fans, thank you Cardiff team, and Clara flying the Ship was superb.

Cold War

Really enjoyed this week's episode! A wonderful SF themed disaster movie, but with a nice slow pace and good dialogue to match the well written characters and impressive performances by both the leading and guest cast. The main attraction, the return of the Ice Warriors, was well handled with an interesting new approach that followed on from Doctor Who: Legacy. The set was amazing and looked the part while also being practical for shooting the scenes. The characters were good, three dimensional people and David Warner, Liam Cunningham and Tovias Menzies all helped to make this a memorable episode for all the right reasons. Anyone that wanted good characters and a properly paced plot, rather than the usual rushing around, had their wish granted this week. Stunning stuff. Nothing seminal or spectacular, just good solid old style Doctor Who back on our screens. Well done Mark Gatiss!

Journey to the Centre of the Tardis

Have now seen JttCotT and give it 9/10 for another superb episode. Slow and steady, with lots of deep and meaningful characterisation of both the regulars and some interesting guest characters. The ending was logical and well thought out, although personally I'm not keen on rewind scenarios. But at least this was limited only to the two ships and it was a time-distortion themed episode anyway, so the ending was in keeping with everything that went before it so I can't fault it there. The pacing was spot on and the direction was very atmospheric, and also managed to fit in okay visually with the scenes of the Ship from The Doctor's Wife two years ago. Loved the red and green lighting for different levels and especially liked the narrow, grey corridors with that distinctive shape that looked every bit as though they had been designed for season one. In fact, they were so much like the corridors of the Dalek city on Skaro from s1 that I'm going to suggest that there's an element of Ray Cusick homage at work for the anniversary - not a big thing, but somthing for the fans that are looking out for it. What nobody has really mentioned, which I thought was the biggest element to this story, was the unbelievable darkness. We see four of the characters including the Doctor and Clara horrifically burned by radiation. These are not visions or echoes but an actual version of the future that we see because the timelines are mixed up by the damage to the engines. Nuclear technology, weapons and accidents are a particular area of interest for me and for anyone that has seen the film K-19: The Widdowmaker (based sadly on a true story) this episode must have struck home. This episode is K-19, reimagined for time travel sci-fi. But returning to the more fantasy elements, I was impressed by all the narrative about the Ship recreating itself and being able to reconfigure the archetecture. These have often been discussed, and the effects seen, in past stories going way back to the 1970s. But to see the characters get caught in the works, like getting your hand taken off by a machine in a factory, was fascinating (in a morbid curiosity sort of way) and deeply shocking. The benchmark for good drama set entirely inside the Ship was set very early on with Edge of Destruction, and to see this revisited for the 50th anniversary was great to see and imo was very well done.

The Crimson Horror

This season just continued to be completely brilliant and I'm even going to say that I'm enjoyed the show more than any other season from 2005 onwards. Another really good 9/10 episode again today! Loved the whole Victorian Steam-Punk sub-genre style of The Crimson Horror, with nods to other pseudo-Victorian detective series and some wonderful contemporary humour like the SatNav joke with Thomas Thomas. Since watching A Good Man Goes to War back in 2011, something that I have really wanted to see is a proper Jenny episode and this repayed the wait with interest as this was the superb Vastra, Jenny and Strax adventure that The Snowmen sadly was not. What was great here was the way that the Doctor didn't come into the story for a whole 15 minutes, before we learned about the first part of the adventure through that wonderful flashback sequence shown like an old hand-colourised sepia film recording, which provided a contrast with episodes like Cold War where the Doctor and Clara burst onto the scene in the first few moments. The script by Mark Gatiss was excellent, with a good logically developed plot and well rounded characters. The acting was equally good from the regulars and this week's leading guest stars Diana Rigg and Rachael Stirling. Matt Smith and Jenna-Louise Coleman are electric together and their scenes pretending to be Yorkshire folk in the flashback were wonderfully hilarious without being disrespectful to people from that part of the country (which is an easy line to cross) and the closing scene in the back alleyway where Clara turns around the Doctor's joke about her being the boss into a risque double entendre was very well done without being over the top. And the final closing scene, back in the present day, it set up the next week very nicely...

Nightmare in Silver

Well, that was enjoyable enough. Some things I like about Nightmare in Silver...

The theme-park setting was very effective, especially the castle scenes filmed at Caerphilly Castle and Castell Coch; Murray Gold's musical references to his score for the original new series Cyberman story Rise of the Cybermen/Age of Steel; Matt Smith's ability and versatility as an actor, being able to successfully pull off the very demanding dual-role sequences; Following on from the point above, the whole homage to The Three Doctors with the 'mind battle'. (although it was too ambitious); Warwick Davis performance is the very best thing about the whole episode imo and I can understand others' enthusiasm about him; The redisign of the Cybermen, and effectively bringing the parallel Cyberman timelines together on screen for the first time; Jenna-Louise Coleman really is another talented and attractive (stunning!) actress to follow Karen Gillan into the companion role; Again partially covered above, but the location filming for this episode was really eye-catching and well done.

What didn't I like about the episode? The plot inconsistencies that have already been mentioned elsewhere. Why not leave the children inside the Ship if there is danger on the planet; why doesn't Porridge say '"or we could just transmat off the planet altogether and use the bomb" rather sooner; why is this either 1. an uninhabited planet (not explained) or 2. an act of genocide of an indigenous population that virtually goes without challenge or regret from the Doctor; and exactly how do the Cybermen upgrade themselves physically, which is a giant leap even for sci-fi forces?

All in all, imo they got lots of individual elements right but left some important wider issues unanswered.

The Name of the Doctor

Really enjoyed this episode. It was a celebration of the show past and present, but a full and well developed plot of its own too. Everything was sensible and handled in the right way, with no 'shock' revelations that might have felt out of place. Everything was... well... like Doctor Who really! The explanation of the Clara mystery was handled in such a way that the character is exactly as she was before, not changed forever like Donna or River Song were, but with a good reason for there being multiple Claras through time and space. But the mechanism of the Clara duplicates was very much the same sort of thing as the Scaroth splinters in City of Death so it felt comfortable to me. The scenes with Clara and the First Doctor were especially good, and the special way that past and present were blended together is what earns this one the extra mark out of ten from me this time around. All the protagonists were given decent roles with nobody mysteriously forgotten part way through, and the antagonists were well portrayed too imo as I was worried that too much would be revealed about the Great Intelligence. Good stuff.

First impressions of s33 episodes rescued from previous version of the site...
Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow. I bet that means something. It sounds great.

Blake's 7: Trojan Horse (s4 fanfic) - Blake's 7: Through the Needle's Eye (s2 fanfic)

Spaceship Dispatcher's fanfic site
 
Klenotka
I think the second half of season 7 was actually really good. I am not sure what problem people have with it. As much as I loved Rory, I wish Clara could have been the companion since the beginning of Smith´s era because with her, I liked him Grin Still my least favourite Doctor but I think Clara´s calmer, less dependet character was better suited than bratish Amy...(sorry, SD Grin )

My favourite are probably Cold War and Hide. Cold War showed us more of Clara, it had a good atmosphere and some great supporting characters. Ice Warriors are also my favourite aliens on DW so I was thrilled that they are officially still around so we can see them again.

Hide was just a good ghost story and I love ghost stories. The atmosphere and the guest actors! They were both great! Of course, it was obvious that it was not a real ghost but still, it was a nice twist.

Nightmare in Silver is probably my least favourite episode (in general from the new series) just because of the annoying kids. I didn´t understand why Clara told them the truth and I can imagine Capaldi´s Doctor to be less...tolerant with them Grin
Especially that girl was terrible. Fortunately, they shut them up after a while.And I really loved Doctor´s Wife, which was another Gaiman´s episode.

The Name of the Doctors was, imo, the best and most consistent Moffat´s finale. He is probably even bigger megalomaniac than RTD was and I suspect that even he has no clue about the state of the universe after all the resets and reboots he made. But I liked the explanation of Clara´s presence in different timelines and I liked that Eleven finally showed more concern about *her* than just the mystery surrounding her.
I think Clara really helped me to like this episode (and season).

Season 7a had some good points but it was not really great. I thought the departure of Ponds was overdone (the moment they jumped from the roof was fantastic, so they could have just leave it there, like they were timelocked or something) and the only thing I really appreciated was Rory, his dad, their interactions and the fact that it was told in a reverse order (so in 11´s life, "Angels" became first and he then kept coming for them until the "Asylum"Wink.

But I am not saying it was bad, just sort of overshadowed by the Ponds´ departure, later supported by rumours that Matt Smith will also leave after the Anniversary. The split series was weird so I think they should have just left it as one season - it IS one season, but when it aired, there was the long break so I guess I will never be able to look at it as one single season.

P.S. - Snowmen was the only Christmas Special with Smith I liked and thanks to the atmosphere (and the appreciated Doctor´s solitude as a consequence to the loss of Amy and Rory) and well written bad guys, I think, one of my favourite Christmas specials since The Runaway Bride and Voyage of the Damned Smile
 
meegat39
When will we three meet again? In thunder, lightning or in rain.. No, seriously, when will Dr Who be back on our screens again, will it be Easter, as normal?
"If you didn't want the answer, you shouldn't have asked the question."
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
meegat39 wrote:

When will we three meet again? In thunder, lightning or in rain.. No, seriously, when will Dr Who be back on our screens again, will it be Easter, as normal?

August I believe, but then it will be a whole season in one go and not split in two parts.
Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow. I bet that means something. It sounds great.

Blake's 7: Trojan Horse (s4 fanfic) - Blake's 7: Through the Needle's Eye (s2 fanfic)

Spaceship Dispatcher's fanfic site
 
meegat39
Spaceship Dispatcher wrote:

meegat39 wrote:

When will we three meet again? In thunder, lightning or in rain.. No, seriously, when will Dr Who be back on our screens again, will it be Easter, as normal?

August I believe, but then it will be a whole season in one go and not split in two parts.


Okay, thanks SD!
"If you didn't want the answer, you shouldn't have asked the question."
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
Klenotka wrote:
I think the second half of season 7 was actually really good. I am not sure what problem people have with it.

Me neither! Its my favourite series of the BBC Wales production era; its back to basics, traditional Dr Who with stories that are not mutually dependant upon each other and have simple 'short story' plots for the most part. The acting was all good - even KG got into the groove imo - and we had a classic Dalek story and the return of...

Klenotka wrote:
Ice Warriors are also my favourite aliens on DW...

Mine too! Their four stories in the original series were all traditional atmospheric futuristic fantasy or space opera, and the Warriors themselves progressively became more three dimensional - especially imo in Monster of Peladon. Great to see them back, and since the chronology of IW stories is not linear (and never has been) Cold War does not contradict any classic series continuity imo; the sequence is Cold War, then The Seeds of Death, then The Ice Warriors and the Peladon stories after that.

Klenotka wrote:
Hide was just a good ghost story and I love ghost stories

Absolutely. Not sure why this one was criticised for not being complicated enough and having a 'villain' added; the best stories in the supernatural genre imo are simple stories that don't become over complicated with too many characters or have to 'explain' everything - sometimes leaving a phenomena as just that. Here with the time tracks running at different speeds and creating a pocket dimension by their dissimilarity, we have a simple and ultimately unexplained phenomena in the mould of Sapphire and Steel - where time itself and how it works becomes a threat without the need for extra antagonists. It follows a good short story format and has good, three dimensional characters who are played by two popular mainstream actors. There's a even a nice Primeval homage (the rival show on ITV some years back and a worthy rival at that) with the creatures in the pocket Universe coming through into our own world from a possible 'future', maybe an alternate Universe. Again, the fact that its left unexplained is for me one of the great strengths of the story.
Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow. I bet that means something. It sounds great.

Blake's 7: Trojan Horse (s4 fanfic) - Blake's 7: Through the Needle's Eye (s2 fanfic)

Spaceship Dispatcher's fanfic site
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
The Five(ish) Doctors

Finally got to watch this 30 minute special this morning - loved every moment Grin

Considering that Peter Davison used to be the most sceptical former star of the show (apart from Jackie Lane) about the series qualities and the enthusiasm of fandom, its amazing that he produced such long and brilliant short film. Its loaded with humour that, while it digs at the show to an extent, you have to be a fan to appreciate it fully and certainly to actually write it in the first place! So many lines are quoted or misquoted from classic episodes, and stars and creative team alike indulge in self-parody in a way that would only happen in a production motivated by love for show and deep appreciation for what it means to everyone involved. Quite a u-turn for a man so dismissive of Dr Who in the past, and when interviewed for a 1990s unofficial documentary called The Doctors: Thrity Years of Time Travel. Full credit and kudos to Peter Davison for spending so much time on this, and using his status in the Whoniverse to involve so many people in the project. The drama never becomes 'silly' and is never rude about the show or anyone that works on it; and the fact that its an unofficial Doctor Who based drama makes it something that I thought was very much in the past. There's even a clever twist near the end when, the Dalek scene having been cut from the episode, its implied that the three Doctors were in the scene within the Black Archive instead! The concept of the film is quite clever in itself, and worthy of the show that inspired it: a fantasy story starring real people as themselves, trying to become part of another fantasy story - a fiction within a fact within a fiction within a fact. Also amusing - whether its clever or not depends upon whether Peter knew Paul's secret - is the fact that Paul McGann has to drop out due to a filming commitment; filming the prequel mini-episode Night of the Doctor probably! Definately the best anniversary production, beating even the already amazing Day of the Doctor and An Adventure in Space and Time.
Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow. I bet that means something. It sounds great.

Blake's 7: Trojan Horse (s4 fanfic) - Blake's 7: Through the Needle's Eye (s2 fanfic)

Spaceship Dispatcher's fanfic site
 
Klenotka
It was brilliant. Just made from a pure love to the material.

I think the anniversary was well made overall. I am not a big fan of big specials where many characters come together just to be nostalgic, without any story in it. So I am happy they just made The Day of the Doctor a normal, better, bigger movie-lenght episode with some actual story in it (but with many surprises and references), then the short, fantastic special for Paul McGann so he could have his regeneration (so the only Doctor without one is Sixth - he sort of had one but it was weird) and then this. A perfect circle. I loved it.
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
trevor travis wrote:

Woo-hoo, my Web Of Fear DVD has arrived!!!


Enjoy! Hope it lives up to your expectations* Happy

*it lived up to mine and, as it was one of my favourite stories, those were big expectations!
Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow. I bet that means something. It sounds great.

Blake's 7: Trojan Horse (s4 fanfic) - Blake's 7: Through the Needle's Eye (s2 fanfic)

Spaceship Dispatcher's fanfic site
 
BradPaula
SD: I'm so glad you loved The Five-ish Doctors. I think we Doctor Who fans were given the biggest bouquet of roses for the 50th Anniversary- The Day of the Doctor was amazing. Adventures in Space and Time- again, amazing, and to top it all off we have Peter Davison's gift to Doctor Who fans young and old. I only wish you could have witnessed it at TARDIS con, where the con staff organized for Sunday morning to be the time when they showed all three programs to the fans. We were there (along with 1000+ of our close personal friends) for The Day of the Doctor and I only wish you could have heard the gasps and applause when Tom Baker was revealed as the curator. And then we were treated to Peter Davison on stage the entire time while his Five-ish Doctors played. It was heart-warming to see how pleased Peter was with every gasp, laugh and heart-tugging aahhh... I think the highlight of it all was when the three Doctors wonder aloud why they are trying to get into the Day of the Doctor set. They muse and mull it over to finally come to the conclusion that, "We're doing it for the fans". Well, there wasn't a dry eye in the house and the deafening applause said it all. Peter was beaming. So I don't think we could have had anything better for our 50th anniversary than what we got. -Paula
Zil: Oneness must resist the Host.
 
Ellen York
The Five-ish Doctors is the only one of the "anniversary specials" that I have seen. I haven't gotten into new Dr Who yet (I can only handle one mad, sad fandom at a time), but I loved the original as a kid. I stumbled on a link for the Five-ish Doctors and watched it out of curiosity. I'm glad I did, it was lovely. Davison, Baker and McCoy were so adorable together. The "who is going to call Tom" scene was priceless, as was the "if you don't stop quoting yourself, I'm putting you back on the plane" scene.
 
GoldChannel
the Web Of fear dvd is a thing of beauty, from the film-style cover down to the gorgeousness of the restored episodes!
 
Asimov
Hi all,

Haven't had much time to read the forum lately. I started a new job 3 months ago and I have been very busy trying to keep it.

In the past I have got very good at 3D modelling in 3ds max which is software I know very well. Unfortunately in my new job I am doing a lot of CAd stuff using autodesk inventor which I don't know that well. Anyway to get my feet wet I decided to build something to learn the software and I decided to build the Tardis Interior. Now this is my re-imagining of the Tardis set from the 1970's with a much bigger budget. I never ever liked the Jules Verne Tardis they keep depicting in the new Doctor who. I always loved the clean lines and gleaming control panels.

Anyway this is a long way off finished, and it isn't my finest 3D work as I am only learning this new software, but this is my progress so far.
i1188.photobucket.com/albums/z414/asimov500/Tardis%20Interior/tardisinterior.jpg
i1188.photobucket.com/albums/z414/asimov500/Tardis%20Interior/22360_5320fb2e90af7.jpg
i1188.photobucket.com/albums/z414/asimov500/Tardis%20Interior/showcaseInterior.jpg
 
BradPaula
Asimov, I think you have a good start with the TARDIS set. Keep us up to date as you progress with it. Thanks for sharing! -Paula
Zil: Oneness must resist the Host.
 
Asimov
Hi BradPaula,

Thanks. I have just built a spiral staircase to get to the upper level. That was hard to work out. I keep adding bits as I come up with ideas. Coming on well.
 
President Solvite
Ahh some nice visuals there. Well done Asimov

You can always export Inventor Models to 3ds MAX you know

If you are using a Design Suite, they have direct workflows, that seemlessly (yes I am using that term accurately) transfers geometry, materials, mapping coordinates and lighting, along with preset camera views.

Hopefully you are using the latest version that is fully service packed, the transfer methods are much more robust.

Although Inventor's rendering is adequate you will get much better results using Max with any renderer (MR/Vray or Maxwell etc..)

But in any case keep up the good work! Smile
 
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