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Current Poll

Who is your Favourite Guest Rebel?

Avalon - (Project Avalon)
Avalon - (Project Avalon)
18% [17 Votes]

Selma - (Horizon)
Selma - (Horizon)
5% [5 Votes]

Tyce - (Bounty)
Tyce - (Bounty)
14% [14 Votes]

Norm One - (Redemption)
Norm One - (Redemption)
2% [2 Votes]

Bek - (Shadow)
Bek - (Shadow)
7% [7 Votes]

Kasabi - (Pressure Point)
Kasabi - (Pressure Point)
19% [18 Votes]

Hal Mellanby - (Aftermath)
Hal Mellanby - (Aftermath)
14% [14 Votes]

Hunda - (Traitor)
Hunda - (Traitor)
5% [5 Votes]

Deva - (Blake)
Deva - (Blake)
9% [9 Votes]

Other
Other
6% [6 Votes]

Votes: 97
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Started: 09 July 2016

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What are you reading?
Klenotka
I just finished "Broken Homes" from the series by Ben Aarontowich. I felt it was a bit less fun and less good than previous books and the twist was a bit predictable (at least for me). But I am glad we got to know Knightingale better and the stakes are high for the next book.
Donīt be Lasagne
 
RichardMk2
I'm now reading "The Tinner's Corpse" by Bernard Kinight. A medeaval whodunnit set in Devon during the reign of Richard the Lionheart, told from the point of view of the County Coroner. Quite an enjoyable read so far.
 
rojkerr1
The Forsaken, Space 1999
 
Gauda Cheese
Finished Batman Knightfall vol 1 and now its the Judge Dredd Case Files volume 1
http://stwco.word... Stuff and things written by me.

My podcast: http://GATM.buzzs...
 
Joe Dredd
Gauda Cheese wrote:
now its the Judge Dredd Case Files volume 1


Wa-hey!

Have you read any Dredd before, GC? If not, keep in mind this is the very earliest of Dredd, from a comic aimed at 10 - 14 year old boys. The writers were still finding their feet and fleshing out his world. I'm sure there's one early strip that shows a regular police force, and another where they mention there's only about nine Judges in the entire Mega City.

"Which title would you use to introduce someone to Judge Dredd?" is a perennial topic of conversation on the 2000AD forums. The general consensus is that Case Files (CF) 5 is a good starting point. It begins with some straight, no-nonsense policing stories which are then followed by a tale about the supernatural Judge Death and the Apocalypse War mega-epic.

CF5 is in black & white (as is CF1), so alternatively some of the modern classics are likewise great to start with, and in full colour - "The Pit", "Mandroid", and "Total War" all spring to mind. I also love "Incubus", the Judge Dredd/Aliens cross over. Henry Flint's artwork is excellent (though as these guys point out CF5 has brilliant art by Brian Bolland*).

JD has also had crossovers with Predator and Batman. They're okay but the Aliens crossover leaves them in the shade.

While I'm raving on, I'll just mention "Kingdom", my favourite 2000AD story from recent times. Giant insects from space - "Them" - have arrived on Earth and begun multiplying and taking over. The remnants of mankind are forced to retreat to the Antarctic, where it's too cold for the insects to go. Standing guard while mankind sleeps in stasis are modified dog-human soldiers. "Get offa my lawn!"



*Here's a shorter video with a few different recommendations but more shots from inside the books: Click!
 
Travisina
Joe Dredd wrote:

Gauda Cheese wrote:
now its the Judge Dredd Case Files volume 1


Wa-hey!

CF5 has brilliant art by Brian Bolland.

Hubby once queued for hours in the heat (yes, we do sometimes get hot days in London) to get Brian Bolland's autograph. In the end, not only did BB sign his book but added a quick little sketch of Dredd next to his signature! Hubby was well chuffed, and considered it worth the heat-induced migraine he suffered afterwards.
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
Gauda Cheese
Joe Dredd wrote:

Gauda Cheese wrote:
now its the Judge Dredd Case Files volume 1


Wa-hey!

Have you read any Dredd before, GC? If not, keep in mind this is the very earliest of Dredd, from a comic aimed at 10 - 14 year old boys. The writers were still finding their feet and fleshing out his world. I'm sure there's one early strip that shows a regular police force, and another where they mention there's only about nine Judges in the entire Mega City.

"Which title would you use to introduce someone to Judge Dredd?" is a perennial topic of conversation on the 2000AD forums. The general consensus is that Case Files (CF) 5 is a good starting point. It begins with some straight, no-nonsense policing stories which are then followed by a tale about the supernatural Judge Death and the Apocalypse War mega-epic.

CF5 is in black & white (as is CF1), so alternatively some of the modern classics are likewise great to start with, and in full colour - "The Pit", "Mandroid", and "Total War" all spring to mind. I also love "Incubus", the Judge Dredd/Aliens cross over. Henry Flint's artwork is excellent (though as these guys point out CF5 has brilliant art by Brian Bolland*).

JD has also had crossovers with Predator and Batman. They're okay but the Aliens crossover leaves them in the shade.

While I'm raving on, I'll just mention "Kingdom", my favourite 2000AD story from recent times. Giant insects from space - "Them" - have arrived on Earth and begun multiplying and taking over. The remnants of mankind are forced to retreat to the Antarctic, where it's too cold for the insects to go. Standing guard while mankind sleeps in stasis are modified dog-human soldiers. "Get offa my lawn!"



*Here's a shorter video with a few different recommendations but more shots from inside the books: Click!


I'm digging CF1 and already have 2 on the way. It's fascinating stuff. Funny in places and as it goes on things get fleshed out more. Dug the Robot Wars. I'm over halfway through it and its all potential, nothings been WOW! but nothings been bad either which is good. I knew going in it'd be a little dated, but overall it's a lot of fun. I can definitely see why people loved this stuff back in the day.
http://stwco.word... Stuff and things written by me.

My podcast: http://GATM.buzzs...
 
Travisina
Sorry to interrupt the flow of conversation about Judge Dredd, but I just wanted to return briefly to 'Night School' -

Gauda Cheese wrote:

You loved Echo Burning too! YAY that one is one of my faves too...

Thinking about that one made me realise that one of the things missing from NS was any sort of atmosphere or sense of place. In 'Echo Burning' the heat sizzles off the page. '61 Hours' made me put on an extra sweater. In 'Night School', it was all just a street, a park, an alleyway, a bar... - but nothing that made me feel I was there. It was the same with the characters, especially as many of them didn't even have names - 'the American, the Iranian, the Messenger' - it was one of the least immersive reading experiences I've ever had.

I've just finished 'Double Dexter' - possibly one of my faves in that series. As well as a fabulous sense of place (the Miami backdrop is as much a character as the characters - Lee Child, please take note), and a tense unravelling mystery, it was laugh-out-loud funny in places. I got strange looks from fellow commuters as I chortled over a novel with a lurid, blood-spattered cover. Smile
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
Gauda Cheese
Finished the JD Case files Vol one and loved it! Its weird and new and finding its feet, but its still good. Right away you can tell why people loved him when he came out and continue to love Dredd to this day.

Reading Batman Knightfall volume 2: Knightquest and its solid Batman goodness.
http://stwco.word... Stuff and things written by me.

My podcast: http://GATM.buzzs...
 
Gauda Cheese
The Secret History Of Twin Peaks by co-creator Mark Frost. So far its amazing.

Also have the Judge Dredd Case Files volume 2 on my shelf
http://stwco.word... Stuff and things written by me.

My podcast: http://GATM.buzzs...
 
Travisina
'Standing in Another Man's Grave' - an Inspector Rebus novel. Because I've never read any of them before, nor have I seen the TV adaptation and was curious. It's okay - passes the time, but is oh so generic. How many times have we seen / read the maverick detective who smokes, has a drink problem, breaks all the rules, annoys those in charge - but has to be the one who solves the crime? Ho hum.

Next up: 'My Cousin Rachel' by Daphne du Maurier for the book club. Not as good as 'Rebecca' (which is one of my fave books of all time), but needs must. But at least I was able to persuade the book club ladies to also choose 'Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy' this month - no mean feat, as most of them are dead set against any sort SF or fantasy!
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
Spaceresearcher
Currently, Ian Banks: Consider Phlebas, while waiting to board my plane to get to Dubai and then on to London. (Wish it would hurry up. Smile ).

It's not a bad tale and interesting to read a writers early work. An interesting way that Mr Banks has of throwing ideas at the reader.
 
Spaceresearcher
Travisina wrote:

'Standing in Another Man's Grave' - an Inspector Rebus novel. Because I've never read any of them before, nor have I seen the TV adaptation and was curious. It's okay - passes the time, but is oh so generic. How many times have we seen / read the maverick detective who smokes, has a drink problem, breaks all the rules, annoys those in charge - but has to be the one who solves the crime? Ho hum.

Next up: 'My Cousin Rachel' by Daphne du Maurier for the book club. Not as good as 'Rebecca' (which is one of my fave books of all time), but needs must. But at least I was able to persuade the book club ladies to also choose 'Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy' this month - no mean feat, as most of them are dead set against any sort SF or fantasy!


Your giving me visions of Star Trek The Next Generations Captain Picard holodeck escapades in the Dixon Hill novels. If not that, then definitely a Humphrey Bogart scene or two. For one more addition, perhaps Tex Murphy. Smile
 
Travisina
Spaceresearcher wrote:

Travisina wrote:

'Standing in Another Man's Grave' - an Inspector Rebus novel ... oh so generic. How many times have we seen / read the maverick detective who smokes, has a drink problem, breaks all the rules, annoys those in charge - but has to be the one who solves the crime?


Your giving me visions of Star Trek The Next Generations Captain Picard holodeck escapades ...

Which are themselves homages to the classic detective story genre. I should probably read some Raymond Chandler next.
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
Gauda Cheese
Travisina wrote:

'Standing in Another Man's Grave' - an Inspector Rebus novel. Because I've never read any of them before, nor have I seen the TV adaptation and was curious. It's okay - passes the time, but is oh so generic. How many times have we seen / read the maverick detective who smokes, has a drink problem, breaks all the rules, annoys those in charge - but has to be the one who solves the crime? Ho hum.

Next up: 'My Cousin Rachel' by Daphne du Maurier for the book club. Not as good as 'Rebecca' (which is one of my fave books of all time), but needs must. But at least I was able to persuade the book club ladies to also choose 'Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy' this month - no mean feat, as most of them are dead set against any sort SF or fantasy!


I tried reading the first Rebus novel that came out in the 80's and even at nearly 30 years old I found it terribly cliched myself.
http://stwco.word... Stuff and things written by me.

My podcast: http://GATM.buzzs...
 
Klenotka
I just finished "Cujo" by Stephen King. Holy cow, that guy can create an amazing atmosphere, not allowing you to put the book down.
Donīt be Lasagne
 
Travisina
Gauda Cheese wrote:

Travisina wrote:

'Standing in Another Man's Grave' - an Inspector Rebus novel. Because I've never read any of them before, nor have I seen the TV adaptation and was curious. It's okay - passes the time, but is oh so generic. How many times have we seen / read the maverick detective who smokes, has a drink problem, breaks all the rules, annoys those in charge - but has to be the one who solves the crime? Ho hum.


I tried reading the first Rebus novel that came out in the 80's and even at nearly 30 years old I found it terribly cliched myself.

Ok, I'll get to the end of this one, but I don't think I'll seek out any more.
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
President Solvite
My instruction booklet to assemble Civil Administration Ship 'London'

Pfft
 
http://nothingsforgotten.freeforums.net/
dragonq
Back on my Clive James fest, last night I read Clive James on Television, more or less in one sitting. Like scoffing chocolates. Today I started The Essex Serpent, by Sarah Perry, which has received very good reviews and been recommended to me by a number of people: a hundred and fifty pages in and I am underwhelmed. It's ok, and I will finish it, but my initial assessment is that it's a sort of sub-Sarah Waters. There are period details that don't ring true or are just wrong (yet another author who fails to realise that in the 19th century middle class women did not attend funerals, but stayed home while the men went--if you want proof, just read the first volume of The Forsyte Saga) and it's a poor stylist who has all the characters use the same voice when they compose letters, regardless of age, sex or profession.
Edited by dragonq on 13 June 2017 03:56:38
 
Travisina
President Solvite wrote:

My instruction booklet to assemble Civil Administration Ship 'London'

Pfft

Hubby assembled ours as soon as I got home last night! <smug mode>
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
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