Login

Username

Password



Not a rebel yet?
CLICK HERE to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one from Orac HERE.

Current User Info

· Lurkers Lurking: 8

· Rebels Active: 0

· Total Rebels: 1,301
· Newest Rebel: StuDon

Login Help

If you are having problems logging in, please bear in mind that if you originally registered at the site before 8th January 2014 and you haven't re-registered since that date your old login details will no longer work. If this is the case, please re-register, preferably with your former username. If you are having trouble with the registration process itself, try looking HERE and HERE for help and advice. If you need further assistance, please do CONTACT us.

Current Poll

Who is your Favourite Guest Rebel?

Avalon - (Project Avalon)
Avalon - (Project Avalon)
22% [45 Votes]

Selma - (Horizon)
Selma - (Horizon)
4% [8 Votes]

Tyce - (Bounty)
Tyce - (Bounty)
15% [30 Votes]

Norm One - (Redemption)
Norm One - (Redemption)
1% [2 Votes]

Bek - (Shadow)
Bek - (Shadow)
7% [15 Votes]

Kasabi - (Pressure Point)
Kasabi - (Pressure Point)
15% [30 Votes]

Hal Mellanby - (Aftermath)
Hal Mellanby - (Aftermath)
17% [34 Votes]

Hunda - (Traitor)
Hunda - (Traitor)
4% [8 Votes]

Deva - (Blake)
Deva - (Blake)
13% [26 Votes]

Other
Other
4% [8 Votes]

Votes: 206
Login to vote.
Started: 09 July 2016

Polls Archive

Forum Activity

Newest Articles

B7 Images

+ Privacy Policy+

In line with the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that came into effect on 25th May 2018, we have updated our Privacy Policy. Click HERE for details.

View Thread

 Print Thread
What are you reading?
Cygnus Bazza
The Golden Age of British Short Stories 1890-1914. Some real gems (and a few duds) in this anthology, including a highly unusual and imaginative piece called The Autobiography of an Idea by Barry Pain. Definitely worth checking out if you like offbeat stuff. It has a whiff of the HP Lovecraft about it, albeit in a much more innocuous way!
 
dragonq
Cygnus Bazza wrote:

The Golden Age of British Short Stories 1890-1914. Some real gems (and a few duds) in this anthology, including a highly unusual and imaginative piece called The Autobiography of an Idea by Barry Pain. Definitely worth checking out if you like offbeat stuff. It has a whiff of the HP Lovecraft about it, albeit in a much more innocuous way!


Thanks for the hint. I've just ordered myself a copy of this. Barry Pain is best known for the Eliza Stories, which are a little bit like Diary of a Nobody, if you're familiar with that. They are worth a look.

The reason it was the golden age of the short story, of course, is the magazine market, which we have completely lost.
 
Cygnus Bazza
dragonq wrote:

Cygnus Bazza wrote:

The Golden Age of British Short Stories 1890-1914. Some real gems (and a few duds) in this anthology, including a highly unusual and imaginative piece called The Autobiography of an Idea by Barry Pain. Definitely worth checking out if you like offbeat stuff. It has a whiff of the HP Lovecraft about it, albeit in a much more innocuous way!


Thanks for the hint. I've just ordered myself a copy of this. Barry Pain is best known for the Eliza Stories, which are a little bit like Diary of a Nobody, if you're familiar with that. They are worth a look.

The reason it was the golden age of the short story, of course, is the magazine market, which we have completely lost.

Fantastic - thanks for the heads-up. I'd never heard of BP before and will definitely track down the Eliza Stories.
 
Lee Bagnall
RAF Secret Jets of the Cold War by Dan Sharp

Covers the aircraft projects designed for Spec. F.155. Highly useful when I'm building several 3d printed kits of the English Electric P.8 and a Saro SR.187 designed to that spec.

P8
theaviationgeekclub.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/EE-P.8.jpg

Saro P.187
alternathistory.com/files/users/user18305/Saunders-Roe_P.187-01.JPG
Note the latter is a 2 seat fighter and is the same length as a Lancaster...
"Seldon, Janov. Space Commander. Alpha 14922. Name, rank and serial number. That's all you're getting!"
 
sweevo
Frank Miller's 4-part comic book miniseries The Dark Knight Returns, which was eventually adapted into a 2-part animated film starring Peter "RoboCop" Weller as the voice of the Caped Crusader.
 
Lee Bagnall
George Orwell's "Keep the Aspidistra Flying"

Saw the film with Richard E Grant some years back so decided to get the book.
"Seldon, Janov. Space Commander. Alpha 14922. Name, rank and serial number. That's all you're getting!"
 
Deva
I'm reading Watership Down to my daughter. (No book has ever had such a profound effect upon me as when I first read Watership Down when I was ten).
"Time really is getting short, you know..."
 
littlesue
Deva wrote:

I'm reading Watership Down to my daughter. (No book has ever had such a profound effect upon me as when I first read Watership Down when I was ten).


When this film was first shown at our local cinema, I remember a lady writing to our local evening paper complaining....she had taken her young daughter to see it expecting to see a warm, fluffy film about Bunnies along the lines of a Disney film...and had to leave early because her young daughter was so horrified and upset.....someone obviously hadn't read the reviews!!!
Cold.....you don't know the meaning of cold.
Cold is when you have ice on the INSIDE of the window!!!


sues stories http://sjlittle.w...
sues youtube channel http://www.youtub...e54/videos
sues book shelf https://www.media...ne%20Shelf
rebel run video http://www.youtub...prqS-XZtLo
Lara and Sue's Stories http://lectorisal....webs.com/
 
One Spare Part
Deva wrote:

I'm reading Watership Down to my daughter. (No book has ever had such a profound effect upon me as when I first read Watership Down when I was ten).

I 1st read it well into adulthood and believe me, the effect was equally as profound. It is one of those rare things - and I am not exaggerating here - a perfect read. It has everything: a great story to begin with; a message, intelligently told with no hint of a lecture; great characters: each rabbit stands out and every animal type has a clear delineation; a well thought out religious belief for the bunnies creates a fascinating story within a story;the pace and shape of the story is well balanced and yes, soppy as this may seem, it is full of heart...actually, soppy is the last thing that this book is. The emotion in it is drawn naturally from the events and interactions of the characters. No manipulation here.
So, yes, profound effect indeed.
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
One Spare Part
littlesue wrote:

Deva wrote:

I'm reading Watership Down to my daughter. (No book has ever had such a profound effect upon me as when I first read Watership Down when I was ten).


When this film was first shown at our local cinema, I remember a lady writing to our local evening paper complaining....she had taken her young daughter to see it expecting to see a warm, fluffy film about Bunnies along the lines of a Disney film...and had to leave early because her young daughter was so horrified and upset.....someone obviously hadn't read the reviews!!!

Do you remember all the furore about the butcher who advertised his wares with a sign which read Watership Down: you read the book, you saw the film - now , eat the bunnies!
People were horrified but I actually think he was closer to the spirit of the story with that advert.
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
One Spare Part
Just on my regular re-read of The Stand / Stephen King. I had suspended this over the pandemic...but it, again, makes for interesting reading... Mr King did his research very well and writes about the science of the subject matter with intelligence and interest. There but for the grace of God....or Chance....
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
EagleTen
My favourite books, and I’ve read them numerous times, and have also purchased the very limited Grim Oak Press lettered reprints (at $400 a pop!) are, the Thomas Covenant Chronicles by Stephen Donaldson

Just starting the first Chronicles again now…Book 1, Lord Foul’s Bane…
 
Spaceship Dispatcher
Just about to start Anthem For Doomed Youth, from Carola Dunn's inter-war set Daisy Dalrymple series of crime novels
 
Lee Bagnall
I'll be starting my yearly re-read of Orwell's 1984 when I've finished the current tome.
"Seldon, Janov. Space Commander. Alpha 14922. Name, rank and serial number. That's all you're getting!"
 
Jump to Forum:
Orac rendered this page in 0.66 seconds
35,824,378 unique visits since 8th January 2014