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What are you reading?
littlesue
Travisina wrote:

Hugbot wrote:
You might wonder why the Hugbot is reading a childrens' book at the tender age of 52...

Not at all - I still read children's books. Recent favourite is Frog and Toad, and I'll happily re-read the classics - Winnie the Pooh and Alice in Wonderland / Through the Looking Glass.


I still have my copy of Black Beauty on my book shelf and the Little House on the Prairie Books. I have been known to take some of the latter on holiday with me. The Long Winter is a very grim read.
But if you are going to be stuck on a desert island, make sure you have Mr Ingalls with you; he'll have a house up, well dug and dinner on the table in no time.
Another story that I cry through whenever I read it (and I did when reading it to Grandson when he was little) is The Happy Prince by Mr Wilde.
Cold.....you don't know the meaning of cold.
Cold is when you have ice on the INSIDE of the window!!!


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Travisina
littlesue wrote:

...the Little House on the Prairie Books. I have been known to take some of the latter on holiday with me. The Long Winter is a very grim read.

I love the Little House books! My Mum's got our set now, and she's re-reading them. What extraordinary lives they led. I'd be hard pushed to choose a favourite - not 'The Long Winter', which is as you say very grim, or By the Shores of Silver Lake, in which (spoiler alert) the dog dies, Laura gets into an awkward pre-teen phase and Mary goes blind - even though the descriptions of the birds coming to the lake, and the building of the railroad are amazing. As a teenager, I particularly liked 'Little Town on the Prairie' and 'These Happy Golden Years' - her high school days, becoming a teacher herself and her courtship & marriage to Almanzo.
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
Joe Dredd
Grade Four Ignorant wrote:
Have you figured out who the UFO interested entertainer who meets with Doug Mitford and Richard Nixon is?

Elvis?

Grade Four Ignorant wrote:
I've just finished reading Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome. I found it wryly and intelligently funny to begin with but about halfway through it started to drag. It's a two-in-one book with the sequel Three Men on the Bummel, but I have very little desire to read the sequel now.

As you say, "Boat" is a mixed bag. I understand JKJ wrote it as a travel book but his editor enjoyed the funny parts so much he asked him to go back and put more of that kind of thing into it. When I first read it, it took me ages to realise Montmorency was the name of the dog. The story of the father (uncle?) hanging a picture sticks in my mind. There's also a nice, almost Avon-like line at the start, where he says of his companions Vila & Gan (to save me remembering their real names) "Vila would be the stupidest man on Earth, if Gan wasn't already."

Instead of reading "Bummel" - I have it too and have never got to it - you could try Connie Willis's "To Say Nothing of the Dog", which connects parts of "Boat" with a time travel story. Alternatively, if you want to continue in a Victorian/Edwardian vein, "The Diary of a Nobody" is a fun read. Keith Waterhouse wrote a parallel work, "Mrs Pooter's Diary", which follows the same story as the original book but from his wife's perspective.
 
Joe Dredd
Hugbot wrote:
a Malayan tapir! A story starring my favourite animal?

That's an interesting favourite animal, Hugbot. Is there any particular reason for liking them so much? Does it stem from the book?

A tapir plays a part in one of my favourite Sherlock Holmes pastiches, "The Giant Rat of Sumatra" by Richard L Boyer. I bought my copy from a paperback rack in a service station during my university years and it's great to see it rereleased by Titan Books as part of their "Further Adventures" range, which republishes a number of other 'must have' non-Doyle Holmes stories. I recommend it, but if you do read it, please forget I mention the tapir otherwise you might hate me forever.


Hugbot wrote:
You might wonder why the Hugbot is reading a childrens' book at the tender age of 52

Not at all! There's definitely no shame in enjoying the simple pleasures in life, and a good book from childhood (or even ones you never had the chance to read before, or never knew of) is definitely one of them.

Recently I've been rereading some of the "Just William" books. I love the dimensions of the recent Macmillan Childrens Books releases, and they've kept the old illustrations inside that I remember from the versions around when I was a boy. I've also enjoyed re-reading some of the "Uncle" books by J P Martin. Our local library had the first two books and I used to borrow them over and over. The books were some of the very first titles Quentin Blake worked on as an illustrator, and as such original editions can go for silly money. Fortunately an omnibus edition was printed a few years ago, allowing me (and perhaps Neil Gaiman) to finally find out what happened in "Uncle and the Treacle Trouble". I've also just got hold of a second hand copy of "C.L.U.T.Z and the Fizzion Formula". It's not a masterpiece by any means, but I still remember buying the first book ("C.L.U.T.Z" - about a bumbling robot) as a boy from the now non-existent Attwaters, and only recently got to wondering whether the author had written anything else. I was equally happy to find "Young Legionary" a few years ago, the prequel to the four-book "Last Legionary" series I read as a young teen. They're not even good bad books but hopefully not so terrible or low as to be regarded as 'guilty pleasures'.

I had the pleasure of reading my children the "Mr Men" books when they were the right age. My own favourite from childhood was Mr Bump, who kept having disasterous accidents. I have an idea for a parody called "Mr Trump" ("Oh dear," thought Mr Trump. "I seem to have accidentally told everyone the Mexicans would pay for my garden wall."). It's interesting to see the continuations by the author's son now include official Doctor Who titles.

Hugbot wrote:
it is really lovely, funny and heart-warming at the same time.

That sounds like a perfect reason to read it.

One further tangential thought. There's a thing called psychogeography, which is about the feelings generated by certain places - large abandoned places, intimate cafes at night time, etc. I'm sure there must be something similar - bibliogeography? - about the places, feelings, impressions and memories attached to where you were and what you did at certain times in your life when you bought or read particular books.
 
Gauda Cheese
Cleaned up at a book fair this weekend picking up a ton of awesome sci/fi novels
http://stwco.word... Stuff and things written by me.

My podcast: http://GATM.buzzs...
 
Travisina
Joe Dredd wrote:

Recently I've been rereading some of the "Just William" books.

YES! Just William is brilliant! I was amazed when I discovered that the author was a woman. The copies I read as a kid had belonged to my parents or grandparents and were hardbacks with the original 1920s-style illustrations (how fab that they're in those re-releases you linked to!). Even though they're old-fashioned, there's a timelessness to the adventures of an 11-year old boy and his gang of friends - not to mention his long-suffering older siblings - the number of romances William unintentionally wrecks for them! Favourite stories are 'William's Truthful Christmas', 'William and White Satin' and 'William Goes to the Pictures' - hilarious, and also an interesting depiction of what early cinema used to be like.

I'm sure there must be something similar - bibliogeography? - about the places, feelings, impressions and memories attached to where you were and what you did at certain times in your life when you bought or read particular books.

Absolutely! Just a few of mine:

Claudine at St Clare's - Enid Blyton. Age 9, summer holiday, beach hut in Hove. Uncle teaching me the word 'oblivious' which he said I was, when reading.

The Last Battle - CS Lewis. Age 11, in the bath (first childhood home, London). Crying over the words (spoiler alert) "Narnia is no more."

The Silver Metal Lover - Tanith Lee. Age 26, in the bath (first own flat, Manchester). Crying over the last line (spoiler alert), "My love, my love, I will see you again."

The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Attwood. Age 33, B&B in Shepperton during the week of sound mixing the first 'Prime Suspect'. Reliving the experience now with the new TV adaptation.
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
Ellen York
Travisina wrote:

littlesue wrote:

...the Little House on the Prairie Books. I have been known to take some of the latter on holiday with me. The Long Winter is a very grim read.

I love the Little House books! My Mum's got our set now, and she's re-reading them. What extraordinary lives they led. I'd be hard pushed to choose a favourite - not 'The Long Winter', which is as you say very grim, or By the Shores of Silver Lake, in which (spoiler alert) the dog dies, Laura gets into an awkward pre-teen phase and Mary goes blind - even though the descriptions of the birds coming to the lake, and the building of the railroad are amazing. As a teenager, I particularly liked 'Little Town on the Prairie' and 'These Happy Golden Years' - her high school days, becoming a teacher herself and her courtship & marriage to Almanzo.


I love them too! Now I want to go read them again. There are also books written about Rose (Laura's daughter) and Caroline (her mother).

https://www.amazo...irie+books
 
Rainesz
Just finished The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin and it was amazing. It's also been optioned to become a television series (as has been done with the The Expanse). I'm ready to start the sequel, The Obelisk Gate, which also won the Hugo award this year. I've found all of her books to be outstanding.

I discovered Jemisin because I'd read that one of her influences was Tanith Lee. And I can't recommend her enough.
 
Klenotka
The Stand by Stephen King (finally!)
Don´t be Lasagne
 
rojkerr1
The nightmare man,child of the vodyanoi
 
meegat39
Travisina wrote:

Joe Dredd wrote:

Recently I've been rereading some of the "Just William" books.

YES! Just William is brilliant! I was amazed when I discovered that the author was a woman. The copies I read as a kid had belonged to my parents or grandparents and were hardbacks with the original 1920s-style illustrations (how fab that they're in those re-releases you linked to!). Even though they're old-fashioned, there's a timelessness to the adventures of an 11-year old boy and his gang of friends - not to mention his long-suffering older siblings - the number of romances William unintentionally wrecks for them! Favourite stories are 'William's Truthful Christmas', 'William and White Satin' and 'William Goes to the Pictures' - hilarious, and also an interesting depiction of what early cinema used to be like.

I'm sure there must be something similar - bibliogeography? - about the places, feelings, impressions and memories attached to where you were and what you did at certain times in your life when you bought or read particular books.

Absolutely! Just a few of mine:

Claudine at St Clare's - Enid Blyton. Age 9, summer holiday, beach hut in Hove. Uncle teaching me the word 'oblivious' which he said I was, when reading.

I loved the St Clare's books and the Mallory Towers ones, still read them occasionally believe it or not!

The Silver Metal Lover - Tanith Lee. Age 26, in the bath (first own flat, Manchester). Crying over the last line (spoiler alert), "My love, my love, I will see you again."

I read this at your recommendation - a lovely book.

The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Attwood. Age 33, B&B in Shepperton during the week of sound mixing the first 'Prime Suspect'. Reliving the experience now with the new TV adaptation.


I read this a few years ago after researching books that had won prizes if you get my drift. A very good read!
"If you didn't want the answer, you shouldn't have asked the question."
 
meegat39
Travisina wrote:

Sorry to interrupt the flow of conversation about Judge Dredd, but I just wanted to return briefly to 'Night School' -

Gauda Cheese wrote:

You loved Echo Burning too! YAY that one is one of my faves too...

Thinking about that one made me realise that one of the things missing from NS was any sort of atmosphere or sense of place. In 'Echo Burning' the heat sizzles off the page. '61 Hours' made me put on an extra sweater. In 'Night School', it was all just a street, a park, an alleyway, a bar... - but nothing that made me feel I was there. It was the same with the characters, especially as many of them didn't even have names - 'the American, the Iranian, the Messenger' - it was one of the least immersive reading experiences I've ever had.

I've just finished 'Double Dexter' - possibly one of my faves in that series. As well as a fabulous sense of place (the Miami backdrop is as much a character as the characters - Lee Child, please take note), and a tense unravelling mystery, it was laugh-out-loud funny in places. I got strange looks from fellow commuters as I chortled over a novel with a lurid, blood-spattered cover. Smile


I've just finished Night School and it was unspeakably dull. The worst Jack Reacher book I have read. I'm hoping that Personal and Never Go back are better because I am yet to read them.

Loved the Dexter books, I am currently rewatching the series' and revisiting the books is definitely a must at some point!
"If you didn't want the answer, you shouldn't have asked the question."
 
sweevo
"The Shepherd's Crown", the final Discworld novel written by Sir Terry Pratchett before his passing. I've been putting it off all this time, but now it's time for me to see how the Discworld universe comes to an end. That, and I've been rereading my début novel, "Salvatore: Arcus Iudicium", and it's given me the inspiration to work on a prequel novel with the working title "Rosh: Fati Tenebris" (although I will admit the MGS games also had a helping hand in giving me ideas) - this prequel takes place during the Cold War, chronicling the original novel's antagonist's descent into tragic villainy.
 
Travisina
I've just read 'Make Me' - as Jack Reachers go, not as dull as 'Night School' but not as good as his earlier ones.

Most recently, I read - and am now re-reading 'The Book of Strange New Things' by Michel Faber. It's one of the most amazing books I've read recently, but I don't want to say what it's about because even that would be a spoiler, if you see what I mean. It's so beautifully crafted, beautifully written, intriguing and compelling. Those of you who like the same sort of books that I like - give it a try!
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
Gauda Cheese
TNG novel Intellivore by the wonderful Diane Duane
http://stwco.word... Stuff and things written by me.

My podcast: http://GATM.buzzs...
 
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